Eyeball Licking – The New Sexual Turn On

Eyeball Licking – The New Sexual Turn On

You really have to hand it to the Japanese, who seem to find the most interesting and outrageous things to spice up the sexual experience.  Eyeball licking, also called “Oculolinctus” or “Worming”, is the new rage among Japanese preteens and has been purported to produce heightened sexual stimulation and even the occasional orgasm.

The Eyeball licking fetish seems to be particularly popular with females, accounting for more than 75% of “Worming” recipients.

Elektrika Energias, 29, particularly enjoys the practice.  She states, “My boyfriend started licking my eyeballs years ago and I just loved it.  “I’m not with him anymore, but I still like to ask guys to lick my eyeballs.  I just love it because it turns me on, like sucking on my toes. It makes me feel all tingly.”

Heh.

Eyeball Licking – The New Sexual Turn On

A video created by Japanese band, Born, may have been the impetus for the most recent eyeball licking craze.

Eyeball licking is not without its dangers however.  There has been a uptick in eye infections in Japan, namely pink eye (conjunctivitis) and Stys, an eyelid infection.  A school in Japan noticed something was amiss when an increasing number of students started showing up wearing eye patches.

You can also get eye chlamydia, that’s right, eye chlamydia, which, if left untreated, will cause the eyelids to turn inward, resulting in excruciating pain and eventually permanent blindness.

Ophthalmologists don’t seem to be happy about the practice either.

“Nothing good can come of this,” warned Dr David Granet, a San Diego ophthalmologist, “There are ridges on the tongue that can cause a corneal abrasion. And if a person hasn’t washed out their mouth, they might put acid from citrus products or spices into the eye.”

Dr. Phillip Rizzuto, a spokesman for the American Academy of Ophthalmology, stated that eyeball licking could potentially lead to blindness (eye chlamydia anyone?).

On the infection front, Dr. David Najafi, ophthalmologist in La Mesa, Calif., remarked that if the licker had a cold sore, it is possible to spread herpes into the eyes as well.

Remember Elektrika Energias:

“I got some weird offshoot of TB in my eye once. I ended up with corneal ulcers and I spent like a month in the hospital,” she said. “Nobody really knows why. Well, I got over it, and I’m fine now. That was like six years ago.

“I’m just safer now, I guess … Live and learn. I mean they don’t really make tongue rubbers, but maybe they should.”

No comment necessary.

Source:  The Huffington Post.

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